Fashion In History

idreamofaworldofcouture:

Paintings by LIm Cheol Hee

Evening Dress 
Mme. Olympe 
1865
This is one of two extant dresses bearing a Mme. Olympe label. Olympe Boisse was a French-born New Orleans dressmaker who regularly traveled to Paris to keep abreast of trend-setting French fashions of the time.such as those by Charles Frederick Worth and Emile Pingat. Mme. Olympe, as she was professionally known, initially was an importer of French goods but in time designed and sold her own garments. Her claim to fame is that, considering the date of this dress, she was one of the first, if not the first, American dressmakers to label her gowns, a practice intiated by Worth et Bobergh in the early 1860s.

Evening Dress

Mme. Olympe

1865

This is one of two extant dresses bearing a Mme. Olympe label. Olympe Boisse was a French-born New Orleans dressmaker who regularly traveled to Paris to keep abreast of trend-setting French fashions of the time.such as those by Charles Frederick Worth and Emile Pingat. Mme. Olympe, as she was professionally known, initially was an importer of French goods but in time designed and sold her own garments. Her claim to fame is that, considering the date of this dress, she was one of the first, if not the first, American dressmakers to label her gowns, a practice intiated by Worth et Bobergh in the early 1860s.

#Evening Dress #Mme.Olympe #1865
Evening Ensemble (Detail)
House of Worth
1887
This is truly an attention getting gown with fantastical themes. The fantasy here is depicted in the bodice which imitates a peasant’s cotton blouse and is played against the traditional 18th century and neoclassical motifs in the skirt embroidery.

Evening Ensemble (Detail)

House of Worth

1887

This is truly an attention getting gown with fantastical themes. The fantasy here is depicted in the bodice which imitates a peasant’s cotton blouse and is played against the traditional 18th century and neoclassical motifs in the skirt embroidery.

#Evening Ensemble #House of Worth #1887
Left Evening dress:
Christian Dior 
1957
This dress was designed by Christian Dior (1905-57) in 1957, the year of his death. It was commissioned by the Baroness Alain de Rothschild to wear for the state visit of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip to Paris in April 1957. Many grand events were held during the visit, such as dinners at the Louvre, Versailles and the Elysée Palace, and also visits to the opera and races.
Middle Evening Dress:
Balmain 
1957
Lady Gladwyn was the wife of the British Ambassador to Paris from 1954 to 1960. She hosted the state visit of Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip at the Embassy in April 1957, and invited her great friend Diana Cooper to attend the dinner held at the British Embassy on Tuesday 9 April, at which this dress was probably worn. It was designed by Pierre Balmain (1914-82), and the bodice features the appliqué technique favoured by him.
Right Evening Dress:
Jacques Fath
1957
While the dress’s surface is a soft, delicate lace, in contrast the underpinnings are highly structured: its petticoat features a boned bodice and a crinoline skirt. The pale violet colour and two-tiered skirt suggest a romantic view of women’s fashion.

Left Evening dress:

Christian Dior 

1957

This dress was designed by Christian Dior (1905-57) in 1957, the year of his death. It was commissioned by the Baroness Alain de Rothschild to wear for the state visit of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip to Paris in April 1957. Many grand events were held during the visit, such as dinners at the Louvre, Versailles and the Elysée Palace, and also visits to the opera and races.

Middle Evening Dress:

Balmain 

1957

Lady Gladwyn was the wife of the British Ambassador to Paris from 1954 to 1960. She hosted the state visit of Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip at the Embassy in April 1957, and invited her great friend Diana Cooper to attend the dinner held at the British Embassy on Tuesday 9 April, at which this dress was probably worn. It was designed by Pierre Balmain (1914-82), and the bodice features the appliqué technique favoured by him.

Right Evening Dress:

Jacques Fath

1957

While the dress’s surface is a soft, delicate lace, in contrast the underpinnings are highly structured: its petticoat features a boned bodice and a crinoline skirt. The pale violet colour and two-tiered skirt suggest a romantic view of women’s fashion.

#Christian Dior #Balmain #Jacques Fath #1957
Ball Gown
Jacques Doucet
1898-1900
This ball gown is simplistic in design, yet extravagant by the choice of materials used. The sheer overlayer is enhanced by the solid lamé underlayers and a sense of luxury is added by the hidden lace flounce at the hem. Undoubtedly, a woman would make an entrance in this dress, as it is extremely seductive with its form fitting silhouette and low décolleté.

Ball Gown

Jacques Doucet

1898-1900

This ball gown is simplistic in design, yet extravagant by the choice of materials used. The sheer overlayer is enhanced by the solid lamé underlayers and a sense of luxury is added by the hidden lace flounce at the hem. Undoubtedly, a woman would make an entrance in this dress, as it is extremely seductive with its form fitting silhouette and low décolleté.

#Ball Gown #Jacques Doucet #1898-1900
Parasol (Detail)
1880 
The most prevalent type of parasol in the Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection is light colored taffeta overlaid with black lace. The parasol seen here is set apart from the rest by the charming configuration of the handle. Very unique, the ivory horse’s hoof is complete with studs at the bottom.

Parasol (Detail)

1880 

The most prevalent type of parasol in the Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection is light colored taffeta overlaid with black lace. The parasol seen here is set apart from the rest by the charming configuration of the handle. Very unique, the ivory horse’s hoof is complete with studs at the bottom.

#Parasol #1880
Wedding Ensemble 
1878
While white is now de rigueur for bridal attire, the fashion for white wedding gowns originated only in the late 19th century and was not commonplace until the 20th century. This dress is a good example of the more practical 19th century practice of brides wearing colored gowns for weddings. The wedding dresses could then be worn again for other receptions and social events. A well-made and finely-detailed example of the period, this dress would have been described as a “cuirass” or “cuirass style” at the time it was made, a term that refers to the form-fitted bodice. A steel-boned corset helped to achieve the ideal figure for the cuirass style in the 1870s and 1880s.

Wedding Ensemble

1878

While white is now de rigueur for bridal attire, the fashion for white wedding gowns originated only in the late 19th century and was not commonplace until the 20th century. This dress is a good example of the more practical 19th century practice of brides wearing colored gowns for weddings. The wedding dresses could then be worn again for other receptions and social events. A well-made and finely-detailed example of the period, this dress would have been described as a “cuirass” or “cuirass style” at the time it was made, a term that refers to the form-fitted bodice. A steel-boned corset helped to achieve the ideal figure for the cuirass style in the 1870s and 1880s.

#Wedding Ensemble #1878
Cape (Detail)
Emile Pingat
1895
This beautifully constructed Pingat cape gains a rich and elegant appearance from its use of coordinating black beadwork embroidery on alternating flat and pleated panels of contrasting materials. That elegance can particularly be seen in the front where the embroidery on the two flannel panels line up to create a larger cohesive design oriented horizontally, as opposed to the other panels which are vertically oriented.

Cape (Detail)

Emile Pingat

1895

This beautifully constructed Pingat cape gains a rich and elegant appearance from its use of coordinating black beadwork embroidery on alternating flat and pleated panels of contrasting materials. That elegance can particularly be seen in the front where the embroidery on the two flannel panels line up to create a larger cohesive design oriented horizontally, as opposed to the other panels which are vertically oriented.

#Cape #Emile Pingat #1895
Robe à la Française
1760–70
Women with coquettish airs were imposing in robes à la française and robes à l’anglaise throughout the period between 1720 and 1780. The robe à la française was derived from the loose negligee sacque dress of the earlier part of the century, which was pleated from the shoulders at the front at the back. The silhouette, composed of a funnel-shaped bust feeding into wide rectangular skirts, was inspired by Spanish designs of the previous century and allowed for expansive amounts of textiles with delicate Rococo curvilinear decoration. The wide skirts, which were often open at the front to expose a highly decorated underskirt, were supported by panniers created from padding and hoops of different materials such as cane, baleen or metal. The robes à la française are renowned for the beauty of their textiles, the cut of the back employing box pleats and skirt decorations, known as robings, which showed endless imagination and variety.

Robe à la Française

1760–70

Women with coquettish airs were imposing in robes à la française and robes à l’anglaise throughout the period between 1720 and 1780. The robe à la française was derived from the loose negligee sacque dress of the earlier part of the century, which was pleated from the shoulders at the front at the back. The silhouette, composed of a funnel-shaped bust feeding into wide rectangular skirts, was inspired by Spanish designs of the previous century and allowed for expansive amounts of textiles with delicate Rococo curvilinear decoration. The wide skirts, which were often open at the front to expose a highly decorated underskirt, were supported by panniers created from padding and hoops of different materials such as cane, baleen or metal. The robes à la française are renowned for the beauty of their textiles, the cut of the back employing box pleats and skirt decorations, known as robings, which showed endless imagination and variety.

#Robe à la Française #1760–70
Mantle (Detail)
Emile Pingat
1891
Emile Pingat had a proclivity for designing carefully finished dresses and outerwear which made him one of the top three French fashion designers during the second half of the 19th century. Active between 1860 and 1896, Pingat was adroit at manipulating multiple textiles and trimmings into a cohesive and elevated garment. He was inspired by design elements of other cultures and often reinterpreted them into his own work, making them unique and intriguing. His elaborately decorated and impeccably tailored outwear was particularly sought after.

Mantle (Detail)

Emile Pingat

1891

Emile Pingat had a proclivity for designing carefully finished dresses and outerwear which made him one of the top three French fashion designers during the second half of the 19th century. Active between 1860 and 1896, Pingat was adroit at manipulating multiple textiles and trimmings into a cohesive and elevated garment. He was inspired by design elements of other cultures and often reinterpreted them into his own work, making them unique and intriguing. His elaborately decorated and impeccably tailored outwear was particularly sought after.

#Mantle #Emile Pingat #1891
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